Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe

writing for parents of the bravest hearts

Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe

green writing for parents

Family Room

A blog about a mother’s story of autism.

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Horsemanship as culture

When we first moved to Texas from California, I was struck by the fact that Fort Worth’s cultural district put world class arenas and art museums side by side. At...

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Making some dust

There aren’t many horseback riding events at Chisholm Challenge where the riders go as fast as they can. Sam hasn’t been barrel racing long, but he’s got the hang of...

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Internet commerce is a wild web

If Sam wrote up his tips for how to avoid getting scammed, it would read something like this. Don’t read email Don’t respond to texts Don’t answer the phone Open...

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Overheard in the Wolfe House #314

Peggy: That box on the front seat of your car is all your old ribbons to take to Mary’s office next time you ride at Born2Be. They can reuse them....

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See Sam Run: A Mother’s Story of Autism

"This is a book written from the heart by a mother nearly driven to madness by her son's maniacal behavior. But she slowly learns how to pay attention to what makes Sam tick, what makes Sam run. And as her journey of discovering what ails Sam unfolds, many parents will find themselves hooked."

-- George Getschow, Writer-in-Residence, Mayborn Graduate
Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas

"See Sam Run is well written and poignant as well as emotionally satisfying for the reader. The author's narrative voice is strong, intelligent and authentic. Her story is one that is important to get out."

-- Dianne Aprile, Spalding University

Thousands of children are diagnosed with autism each year, with a rate of occurrence of 1 in 150 births, compared to 5 per 10,000 just two decades ago. This astounding escalation has professionals scrambling to explain why the devastating neurological disorder, which profoundly affects a person’s language and social development, is on the rise. Are we simply getting better at diagnosing autism, or is a modern health crisis unfolding before us?

See Sam Run

Purchase See Sam Run

Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe

Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe

Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe received a master’s degree in journalism from the University of North Texas. She was among the first members of Families for Early Autism Treatment (FEAT) in California. Following the death of an autistic teenager shot by a police officer, Heinkel-Wolfe helped researchers at the University of North Texas find funding for autism research, including a grant for a police training program now used by police departments across the nation. She lives in Denton, Texas, with her son, Sam, and her two other children, Michael and Paige.