Family Room

A blog about a mother’s story of autism.

Divider

Reagan was wrong. There is no trust when you must verify.

The first time I took Sam to school and left him for a full day was a big leap of faith. I wasn’t alone, of course. Parents want to protect…

Read the full article

Never been to Spain, finally made it to Maine

Sam and I were supposed to go to Spain last year. We booked a cycling tour with the same outfitter that took us to Italy and Germany, and Paige and…

Read the full article

The Silver Linings Playbook

  The world will break your heart ten ways to Sunday. That’s guaranteed. I can’t begin to explain that. Or the craziness inside myself and everyone else. But guess what?…

Read the full article

Small, little men

The national media is noting the ignorance and cruelty in Texas public policy, including the new laws that ban abortion and suppress voting rights. I would argue that the state’s…

Read the full article

Subscribe to the Family Room

Get updates about Peggy’s posts in your inbox

Please enter your name.
Please enter a valid email address.
Something went wrong. Please check your entries and try again.

See Sam Run: A Mother’s Story of Autism

"This is a book written from the heart by a mother nearly driven to madness by her son's maniacal behavior. But she slowly learns how to pay attention to what makes Sam tick, what makes Sam run. And as her journey of discovering what ails Sam unfolds, many parents will find themselves hooked."

-- George Getschow, Writer-in-Residence, Mayborn Graduate
Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas

"See Sam Run is well written and poignant as well as emotionally satisfying for the reader. The author's narrative voice is strong, intelligent and authentic. Her story is one that is important to get out."

-- Dianne Aprile, Spalding University

Thousands of children are diagnosed with autism each year, with a rate of occurrence of 1 in 150 births, compared to 5 per 10,000 just two decades ago. This astounding escalation has professionals scrambling to explain why the devastating neurological disorder, which profoundly affects a person’s language and social development, is on the rise. Are we simply getting better at diagnosing autism, or is a modern health crisis unfolding before us?

See Sam Run

Purchase See Sam Run

Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe

Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe

Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe received a master’s degree in journalism from the University of North Texas. She was among the first members of Families for Early Autism Treatment (FEAT) in California. Following the death of an autistic teenager shot by a police officer, Heinkel-Wolfe helped researchers at the University of North Texas find funding for autism research, including a grant for a police training program now used by police departments across the nation. She lives in Denton, Texas, with her son, Sam, and her two other children, Michael and Paige.